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Flood Safety Tips:
zil world map

Each year, more deaths occur due to flooding than any other hazard related to thunderstorms. The most common flood deaths occur when a vehicle is driven into hazardous flood water. Fortunately, you can take steps to protect yourself, your family, and your home..

During a Flood Watch or Warning

  • Gather emergency supplies.
  • Listen to your local radio or television station for updates.
  • Have immunization records handy (or know the year of your last tetanus shot).
    • Store immunization records in a waterproof container.
  • Fill bathtubs, sinks, gallon jars, and plastic soda bottles so that you will have a supply of clean water.
    • Sanitize sinks/tubs first by cleaning them using a solution of one cup of bleach to five gallons of water. Then rinse and fill with clean water.
  • Bring in outdoor possessions (lawn furniture, grills, trash cans) or tie them down securely.
  • If evacuation appears necessary: turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve.
  • Leave areas subject to flooding: low spots, canyons, washes, etc.

The initial damage caused by a flood is not the only risk. Standing flood waters can also spread infectious diseases, bring chemical hazards, and cause injuries.

Be Ready! Floods Infographic (CDC)

Local Health Observances

July 2017 is National Cleft & Craniofacial Awareness & Prevention Month

   NSM

National Cleft & Craniofacial Awareness & Prevention Month! is sponsored by AmeriFace and cleftAdvocate.

National Cleft & Craniofacial Awareness & Prevention Month Cleft and craniofacial conditions affect thousands of infants, children, teens and adults in the United States each year.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 1 in every 600 births are diagnosed with Cleft lip and/or palate (orofacial clefts). Recently, CDC reported on important findings from research studies about some factors that increase the chance of having a baby with an orofacial cleft:

  • Smoking―Women who smoke during pregnancy are more likely to have a baby with an orofacial cleft than women who do not smoke.2-3
  • Diabetes―Women with diabetes diagnosed before pregnancy have an increased risk of having a child with a cleft lip with or without cleft palate, compared to women who did not have diabetes.5
  • Use of certain medicines―Women who used certain medicines to treat epilepsy, such as topiramate or valproic acid, during the first trimester (the first 3 months) of pregnancy have an increased risk of having a baby with cleft lip with or without cleft palate, compared to women who didn’t take these medicines.6-7

To learn more about these conditions, including treatment options and support networks in your area, contact these participating NCCAPM organizations.

Facts about cleft lip and cleft palate birth defects.

 

Disclaimer: healthelinks is intended for information purposes only, not to offer medical advice.
Please consult your doctor about any personal health concerns.
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