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Surviving the Extreme Heat:



Extreme heat is defined as summertime temperatures that are much hotter and/or humid than average. Because some places are hotter than others, this depends on what’s considered average for a particular location at that time of year. Humid and muggy conditions can make it seem hotter than it really is.

What Causes Heat-Related Illness?

Heat-related illnesses, like heat exhaustion or heat stroke, happen when the body is not able to properly cool itself. While the body normally cools itself by sweating, during extreme heat, this might not be enough. In these cases, a person’s body temperature rises faster than it can cool itself down. This can cause damage to the brain and other vital organs.

Some factors that might increase your risk of developing a heat-related illness include:

  • High levels of humidity
  • Obesity
  • Fever
  • Dehydration
  • Prescription drug use
  • Heart disease
  • Mental illness
  • Poor circulation
  • Sunburn
  • Alcohol use

Who is Most at Risk?

Older adults, the very young, and people with mental illness and chronic diseases are at highest risk.Summertime activity, whether on the playing field or the construction site, must be balanced with actions that help the body cool itself to prevent heat-related illness. Use this website to learn more on how to stay safe in the heat this summer, including how to prevent, recognize, and cope with heat-related illness.

August 2019 is National Immunization Awareness Month

 
Sponsor By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

August is Immunization Awareness Month. This annual observance is held in August to highlight the importance of vaccination for people of all ages.

What is Immunity?


When disease germs enter your body, they start to reproduce. Your immune system recognizes these germs as foreign invaders and responds by making proteins called antibodies. These antibodies’ first job is to help destroy the germs that are making you sick. The antibodies’ second job is to protect you from future infections. They remain in your bloodstream, and if the same germs ever try to infect you again — even after many years — they will come to your defense. This is immunity.

Why Vaccinate?

Immunizations are the number one public health achievement of the last century, saving millions of lives and preventing illness and lifelong disability in millions more. Many childhood diseases now preventable by vaccines often resulted in hospitalization, death or lifelong consequences only a few decades ago. Without immunizations, serious outbreaks of many of the diseases we are now protected from can reoccur.

Six Things YOU Need to Know about Vaccines

  • 1. We all need vaccines throughout our lives to help protect against serious diseases.
  • 2. Outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases can and do still happen in communities across the U.S.
  • 3. CDC and FDA take many steps to make sure vaccines are very safe.
  • 4. Vaccines give you the power to protect your children from getting sick.
  • 5. You can even make sure your baby is born with protection by getting vaccinated when you are pregnant.
  • 6. Vaccines aren’t just for kids. They can help adults stay healthy too – especially if they have health conditions.
  • Disclaimer: healthelinks is intended for information purposes only, not to offer medical advice.
    Please consult your doctor about any personal health concerns.
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