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Surviving Flu Season:



Seasonal flu viruses can be detected year-round; however, seasonal flu activity often begins as early as October and November and can continue to occur as late as May. Flu activity most commonly peaks in the United States between December and February.

Influenza (Flu) types

  • Seasonal
  • Pandemic
  • Avian
  • Swine
  • Influenza in Animals
  • Flu Symptoms:

    • fever* or feeling feverish/chills
    • cough
    • sore throat
    • runny or stuffy nose
    • muscle or body aches
    • headaches
    • fatigue (tiredness)
    • some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

    Take Three Actions to Protect Against Flu:

  • Get Vaccinated
  • Preventive Steps
  • Treatment
  • The flu season is unpredictable. While we know the flu is going to spread each year, the exact timing and length of each flu season can vary. Flu activity often begins to increase in the U.S. in October. The CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October, if possible.

    February 2020 is American Heart Month

     
    Sponsored By: American Heart Association

    Each February, We celebrate American Heart Month by motivating Americans to adopt healthy lifestyles to prevent heart disease. Research shows that we're more successful at meeting personal health goals when we join forces with others.The most common type of heart disease is coronary heart disease, also called clogged arteries. It causes heart attacks and is the #1 killer of women in the United States. Healthy eating and physical activity go a long way to preventing heart disease, and keeping it from getting worse if you already have it. Read on to learn more about heart disease, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, how to find out if you’re at risk, how to protect your heart, and more.

    What Are Your Risk Factors for Heart Disease?

    Risk factors are conditions or habits that make a person more likely to develop a disease. They can also increase the chances that an existing disease will get worse. Important risk factors for heart disease are:

  • Having high blood pressure
  • Having high blood cholesterol
  • Unhealthy lifestyle
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Diabetes and prediabetes
  • Smoking
  • Being physically inactive
  • Having a family history of early heart disease
  • Having a history of preeclampsia during pregnancy
  • Unhealthy diet
  • Age (55 or older for women)
  • Click here to view the #OurHearts Publications

    Disclaimer: healthelinks is intended for information purposes only, not to offer medical advice.
    Please consult your doctor about any personal health concerns.
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